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> Cyril Tawney > Songs > Old Daddy Fox
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Daddy Fox / A Fox Jumped Up

[ Roud 131 ; G/D 3:499 ; Henry H38 ; Ballad Index R103 ; Bodleian Roud 131 ; Wiltshire Roud 131 ; trad.]

Cyril Biddick and chorus sang Daddy Fox in a recording made in 1943 in Boscastle, Cornwall. This was included in 1955 on the anthology The Columbia World Library of Folk and Primitive Music - Volume III: England, edited by Alan Lomax.

Harry Burgess sang The Hungry Fox at home in Glynde, Sussex, on June 19, 1956. This recording made by Mervyn Plunkett was included in 1998 on the Topic anthology To Catch a Fine Buck Was My Delight (The Voice of the People Series Volume 18).

The Young Tradition sang Daddy Fox in 1967 on their second album, So Cheerfully Round. Peter Bellamy commented in the album's liner notes:

I almost learned Daddy Fox in the approved traditional manner, not at my mother's knee, but at the knee of my Great-Aunt Henrietta, who used to sing it to me when was very small. The only problem is that the version which I remember her singing was an American one. Perhaps she learned it from a Burl Ives record on Housewives' Choice. The version we sing here comes from Dartmoor and comes to us indirectly and somewhat changed from the singing of Cyril Tawney.

Cyril Tawney sang Old Daddy Fox on his 1970 Argo album Cyril Tawney Sings Children’s Songs from Devon and Cornwall. He commented in his liner notes:

Collected by Ralph Dunstan from Jim Thomas of Camborne, October 21, 1931. This old song is one of the most popular traditional pieces on either side of the Atlantic, but nowhere are versions more abundant than in Devon and Cornwall. Even in these modern times the song-hunter does not travel far in this region before encountering it. Tunes vary greatly, but the words are fairly rigid, being apparently unaffected not only by distance but by time too. I have seen a mediaeval version whose text differs little from that given here.

Freda Palmer sang The Fox and the Grey Goose in a recording made by Mike Yates at her home in Witney, Oxfordshire in 1972. Int was included in 1975 on the Topic anthology of countryside songs from Southern England, When Sheepshearing's Done, and in 2001 on the Musical Tradition anthology of songs and music from the Mike Yates Collection, Up in the North and Down in the South. Mike Yates commented in the accompanying booklet:

The Fox and the Grey Goose is a universally known song—at least in the version popularised by Burl Ives—although, surprisingly, Freda Palmer had never heard of the latter version until I mentioned it to her. A verse of the song appeared in Gammer Gurton's Garland (1810) and it is one of the songs that Sir Walter Scott listed as being a favourite of his childhood. Many Victorian broadside printers included it in their catalogues, and collectors have found it being sung in many English counties—thus the 117 instances in Roud. Only Alfred Williams' collection from ‘Wassail’ Harvey of Cricklade, Wilts, is from Freda's part of the country, and the majority of English versions come from either Sussex or the south west.

Bob Copper sang The Fox on his 1977 Topic album of countryside songs from the South, Sweet Rose in June.

Melanie Harrold sang this song in 1983 as A Fox Jumped Up on Tim Hart and Friends' album Drunken Sailor and Other Kids Songs. This track was later included on their compilation CD Favourite Nursery Rhymes and Other Children's Songs.

Barry and Robin Dransfield sang Daddy Fox in 1994 on Barry's CD Be Your Own Man. He commented:

One of my very favourite English folksongs. I was struck with this one when I heard it performed by The Young Tradition in the sixties. Their sense of style and pace is still second to none and has certainly inspired me. The fox and family have a wonderful time and get away with it—brilliant. Thanks to Robin for joining me on this one, and I would like to dedicate this to Young Tradition members Royston Wood and Peter Bellamy, both great friends who tragically are no longer with is.

The Ripley Wayfarers (Mick Peat, Barry Renshaw, Andrew Train, Arthur Renshaw and Phil Langham) sang Daddy Fox, “[o]ne of the most popular songs in Folk Clubs, given a new twist by our setting of it to the tune of Carrion Crow”, on their 1971 LP Chips and Brown Sauce. It was also included in 2001 on the Fellside anthology Voices in Harmony.

The Witches of Elswick sang this version of Daddy Fox too in 2003 on their first CD Out of Bed. They commented in their liner notes:

This is a song… about a fox! Fay [Hield] and Gillian [Tolfrey] used to sing versions of this when they were little, but these words were put to the tune of The Carrion Crow by the luscious Mick Peat, of Radio Derby fame.

Ray Driscoll sang Old Father Fox in a recording made by Gwilym Davies in Dulwich in October 1993. It was published in 2008 on his CD Wild, Wild Berry. Gwilym Davies commented in the liner notes that “in most versions the fox is referred to as ‘Daddy Fox’, and Ray’s version is the only one collected in England referring to ‘Father Fox’.”

Jon Boden sang Barry Dransfield's version of Daddy Fox as the January 2, 2011 entry of his project A Folk Song a Day.

Pete Coe sang Daddy Fox in 2011 on his CD Tall Tailes.

John and Sally Kirkpatrick sang Old Father Fox on their 2013 Fledg'ling CD Every Mortal Place. He commented in his liner notes:

People of my generation who grew up listening to Children's Favourites on the BBC Light Programme had no idea there were so many sturdy English alternatives to the way the American singer Burl Ives gave us The Fox. It felt as though he was on every weekend. In fact the song has been around for well over two hundred years, and has been collected and recorded no end of times from traditional English singers. The usual title is The Fox, or The Hungry Fox, or Old Daddy Fox, but Ray Driscoll had picked it up in Shropshire, uniquely, so it seems, as Old Father Fox.

Ray was more of a pub singer than a concert artist, and not only did he take this at quite a lick, but also turned in a crowd-pleasing semi-tone run in a couple of the lines of the verse. This kind of thing doesn't please all of us, however, and I've left that out, as well as tinkering with the words here and there. And foxes never seem to feel the need to be in that much of a hurry, except in dire emergencies, so I've slowed the tempo right down too. But apart from changing the words, the tune, and the speed, this is exactly how Gwilym Davies recorded it from Mr Driscoll!

Steve Roud included The Hungry Fox in 2012 in The New Penguin Book of English Folk Songs. James Findlay, Brian Peters, Bella Hardy and Lucy Ward sang it a year later on the accompanying Fellside CD The Liberty to Choose: A Selection of Songs from The New Penguin Book of English Folk Songs.

Lyrics

Freda Palmer sings The Fox and the Grey Goose

The stars were shining and all things bright.
“Ha-ha”, said the fox, “it's a very fine night
For me to go through the town-di-o,
For me to go through the town.”

The fox when he came to yonders stile
He p(r)icked up his ears and listened awhile.
“Ha-ha”, said the fox, “it's but a short mile,
From this to yonder town-di-o,
From this to yonder town.”

The fox when he came to the farmer's gate,
Who should he see but the farmer's drake.
“I love you well for your master's sake,
But I long to be picking your bones-i-o,
But I long to be picking your bones.”

The grey goose ran around the stack,
“Ha-ha”, said the fox, “you're very fat,
You'll do very well to ride on my back,
From this to yonder town-di-o,
From this to yonder town.”

The farmer's wife she jumped out of bed
And out of the window she popped her head.
“Oh husband, oh husband, the geese are all dead,
The fox has been through the town-di-o,
The fox has been through the town.”

The farmer he loaded his pistol with lead,
And shot the old rogue of the fox through the head.
“Ha-ha”, said the farmer, “I think you're quite dead,
No more you will trouble the town-di-o,
No more you will trouble the town.”

The Young Tradition sing Daddy Fox The Witches of Elswick sing Daddy Fox

Daddy Fox he went out one chilly night
He prayed to the moon for to give him light,
For he'd many many miles to go that night
Before he came to his den-o,
Den-o, den-o
For he'd many many miles to go that night
Before he came to his den-o

Daddy Fox went out on a chilly night
    With a ling dong dilly dong kyro me
Praying for the moon to give him light
    With a ling dong dilly dong kyro me

Chorus (repeated after each verse):
Hey falee falar falero, hey falero lero lee;
Up jumped John, a-ringing on his bell,
With a ling dong dilly dong kyro me.

He ran till he came to a quick kip pen
The ducks and geese they lay therein

So he grabbed the grey goose by the neck
And he throwed a duck all across his back
And he heeded not their quivvy-quivvy-quack
Nor the legs all a-dangeling down-o
Down-o, down-o,
He heeded not their quivvy-quivvy-quack
Nor the legs all a-dangeling down-o.

He grabbed the grey goose by the neck
Threw a little duck all across his back

Then Old Mother Twiddle-Twoddle jumped out of bed
And out of the window she stuck her little head
Crying, “Oh John oh, now the grey goose is dead
And the fox is away to his den-o.”
Den-o, den-o,
Crying, “Oh John oh, now the grey goose is dead
And the fox is away to his den-o.”

Old Mrs Flipper-Flopper jumped out of bed
Through the window she stuck her little head

So John then he rode up to the top of the hill
He blowed his little horn both loud and shrill.
“Play on,” said Reynard, “with your music still
While I trot away to my den-o,”
Den-o, den-o,
“Play on,” said Reynard, “with your music still
While I trot away to my den-o.”

And John rode up to the top of the hill
He blew his little horn both loud and shrill

The fox went back to his cozy den
Little ones were there, they were eight, nine and ten

Then old Daddy Fox and his cubs and his wife
They cut up the goose without any knife,
Saying, “I've never ever had such a supper in my life
And the cubs they can pick on the bones-o,”
Bones-o, bones-o,
Saying, “I've never ever had such a supper in my life
And the cubs they can pick on the bones-o.”

The fox and his wife without any strife
Cut up the goose with a fork and a knife

Melanie Harrold sings A Fox Jumped Up

Oh a fox jumped up one winter's night
And he begged the moon to give him light
For he'd many, many miles to trod that night
Before he reached his den-o

And the first place he came to was a farmer's yard
Where the ducks and the geese declared it hard
That their nerves should be shaken and their rest so marred
By a visit from the fox-o

And he took the grey goose by the neck,
He swung him right up across his back,
The grey goose cried out, “Quack, quack, quack,”
With his legs all dangling down-o

Then Old Mother Slipper-Slopper jumped out of bed
And out of the window she popped her head
Saying, “John, John, the grey goose is gone
And the fox is away to his den-o.”

So John ran up to the top of the hill
And be blew his whistle loud and shrill,
Said the fox, “That is pretty music, still
I'd rather be in my den-o.”

So the fox went back to his hungry den
And his dear little foxes eight, nine, ten,
They said, “Good daddy, you must go there again,
You bring such cheer from the farm-o.”

So the fox and his wife without any strife
Said they never ate a better goose in all their life,
They did very, very well without a fork or a knife
And the little ones picked the bones-o.

Links

See also the Mudcat Café threads Lyr Add: Fox Went Out on a Chilly Night , Lyr Add: Daddy Fox and Barbagal/Daddy Fox - which came first?.