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Tibbie Fowler o' the Glen

[ Roud 5504 ; G/D 8:1691 ; Ballad Index GrD81691 ; trad.]

Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs, Heroic Ballads, etc.

Ewan MacColl sang Tibble Fowler in 1964 on his and Peggy Seeger's Folkways album Traditional Songs and Ballads.

Jock Tamson's Bairns sang Tibble Fowler in 1982 on their Topi album The Lasses Fashion.

Andy M. Stewart sang Tibble Fowler o' the Glen in 1997 on his Green Linnet album Donegal Rain. He noted:

This humorous old ballad was first printed complete in Johnson's Scots Musical Museum in 1789. It was, however, popular much earlier, and a song in the Tea-Table Miscellany of 1725 is directed to be sung “to the tune of Tibbie Fowler o' the Glen”. I like the song, amongst other things, for it's unusual melody and good drive although the lyric does point to the fact that men are avaricious and largely irredeemable.

‘Tibbie” is the Scots diminutive for Isabella.

Mick West sang Tibbie Fowler o' the Glen on the 1998 Linn anthology The Complete Songs of Robert Burns Volume 4.

Barbara Dymock and Christine Kydd sang Tibbie Fowler o' the Glen in 2009 as Sinsheen on their CD Lift, and Barbyra Dymock sang it in 2016 on her ambum Leaf an' Thorn.

Lyrics

Andy M. Stewart sings Tibble Fowler o' the Glen

Tibbie Fowler o’ the Glen
There’s ower mony wooin’ at her,
Tibbie Fowler o' the Glen
There’s ower mony wooin’ at her.

Chorus (after each verse):
Wooin’ at her, puin’ at her,
Courtin’ her and canna get her.
Filthy elf it’s for her pelf,
That a’ the lads are wooin’ at her.

Ten cam' east and ten cam’ west,
Ten cam’ rowin’ ower the water.
Twa cam’ doun the lang dyke-side,
There’s twa and thirty wooin’ at her.

There’s seven but and seven ben,
Seven i’ the pantry wi’ her.
Twenty head about the door,
There’s ane and forty wooin’ at her.

She’s got pendles in her lugs,
Cockle-shells wad set her better.
High-heeled shoon and siller tags
And a’ the lads are wooin’ at her.

Be a lassie e’er sae bleck
An she hae the name o’ siller,
Set her upo’ Tintock tap,
The wind will blaw a man up till her.

(repeat first verse)